Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Knee replacement

Knee replacement



This animation shows how knee replacement surgery is done and explains why it would be needed.
Most people who have a total knee replacement are over 65.
For most people, a replacement knee will last for at least 15 to 20 years, especially if the new knee is cared for properly and not put under too much strain.
Learn more in how knee replacement surgery is performed.
The most common reason for knee replacement surgery is osteoarthritis.
A knee replacement is major surgery, so is normally only recommended if other treatments, such as physiotherapy or steroid injections, haven't helped reduce pain or improve mobility.
You may be offered knee replacement surgery if:
Learn more in why knee replacement surgery is used.
Adults of any age can be considered for a knee replacement, although it's typically recommended for older people as young, physically active people are more likely to wear the joint out.
The earlier you have a knee replacement, the greater the chance you will eventually need further surgery. However, there is some evidence that replacing the knee joint before it becomes very stiff leads to a better outcome.
Most total knee replacements are carried out on people between the ages of 60 and 80. You will need to be well enough to cope with both a major operation and the rehabilitation afterwards. Read more about getting ready for knee replacement surgery and recovering from knee replacement surgery.
Knee replacement surgery is a common operation and most people do not experience complications.
In some cases, the new knee joint may not be completely stable and further surgery may be needed to correct it.